Allergies & Asthma

HOUSTON — Ragweed sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was associated with improved allergy symptoms and was generally well tolerated in pediatric patients, according to results of a phase III study. The trial of over 1,000 children met its primary endpoint. During peak ragweed season, those treated with the daily ragweed SLIT tablet (Ragwitek) had a 38.3% relative
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An allergy is the immune system’s reaction to a foreign substance, or allergen, in the body. Typical symptoms of seasonal and environmental allergies include a runny nose, sneezing, sinus congestion, and itchy eyes. A less common symptom of allergies is vertigo, which is a severe form of dizziness. A person may experience this symptom during
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Doctors prescribe anti-inflammatory drugs long or short term to treat a range of conditions from allergies to arthritis. But could some of these drugs actually increase the risk for another chronic condition — diabetes? Share on PinterestRegular doses of glucocorticoids may increase the risk of diabetes, some researchers argue. Glucocorticoids are a type of anti-inflammatory
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HOUSTON — Hospital emergency department (ED) visits for anaphylaxis among very young children have doubled in recent years, though hospitalizations fell by more than half among this age group, according to research reported here. Lacey Robinson, MD, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, noted that using the nationally representative Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) database,
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HOUSTON — Treatment with omalizumab (Xolair) was associated with improved endoscopic, clinical, and patient-reported outcomes in two parallel phase III studies in patients with steroid-refractory nasal polyposis. In the POLYP 1 and POLYP 2 trials, co-primary study endpoints were met, with omalizumab-treated patients showing significant improvements at week 24, compared with placebo-treated patients, in sense
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WASHINGTON — A kappa opioid agonist significantly relieved itching for patients on hemodialysis, a researcher said here. Among 378 patients with moderate-to-severe pruritus, 0.5 mcg/kg intravenous difelikefalin administered after dialysis treatment significantly improved itching intensity relative to placebo at week 12, measured by at least a three-point improvement on the Worst Itching Intensity Numerical Rating
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Numbness means an absence of feeling or loss of sensation. A numb face can be a symptom of one of many health conditions, including migraine and allergies. Numbness on any part of the body usually occurs as a result of damage to the nerves or a disturbance in their function. Problems with the nerves can
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Note that some links may require subscriptions. The Trump administration may allow mint- and menthol-flavored vaping products to stay on the market after all. (Bloomberg) Firefighters aren’t the only ones facing occupational health risks from the wildfires raging in California. (Kaiser Health News) Former Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.), the longest-serving African American in Congress
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SAN ANTONIO — More than half of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) had objective responses to treatment with an oral formulation of a topical corticosteroid, a randomized, placebo-controlled trial showed. After 12 weeks of treatment budesonide oral suspension (BOS), 53.1% of patients had histologic response (defined by reduced eosinophil count), and 52.6% had symptomatic response
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earn free cme credit Earn CME credit by reading this article and completing the posttest. Sign Up Study Authors: Mark T. Dransfield, Helen Voelker, et al.; William MacNee Target Audience and Goal Statement: Pulmonologists, cardiologists, emergency department physicians, critical care specialists The goal of this study was to examine if a beta-blocker (extended-release metoprolol) would
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Noteworthy and even game-changing new treatments and therapeutic strategies for COPD, cystic fibrosis, and other pulmonary diseases happened in 2019, but the headlines continue to be dominated by a still mysterious outbreak of vaping-related lung injuries. Few EVALI Answers In mid-August, health officials with the CDC first announced their investigation of close to 100 cases
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Adverse childhood events (ACEs), such as emotional abuse, domestic violence, or incarceration, were commonly reported by U.S. adults, and these events were associated with the later development of many of the country’s leading causes of death, according to CDC survey data. Of 144,017 individuals who completed a phone survey, those who reported at least four
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Medications that can worsen heart failure (HF) are often continued or even initiated during heart failure hospitalizations, a study showed. Fully 49% of patients hospitalized for HF were prescribed HF-exacerbating medications at some point prior to discharge, and for 12% the number of such drugs increased during the hospitalization, according to Parag Goyal, MD, of
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NEW ORLEANS — In a subgroup analysis of the ASCENT-COPD trial results, use of the long-acting inhaled muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) aclidinium bromide (Tudorza) was associated with a reduced risk for exacerbations and a similar safety profile in patients with and without a recent history of exacerbations. Original findings from the trial, published last spring, showed
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NEW ORLEANS — Real-world data from the Mayo Clinic confirmed that biologic therapies reduce asthma exacerbations and the need for steroids in patients with severe, refractory, oral steroid-dependent asthma, according to a study presented here. These patients experienced an average of four exacerbations in the 12 months before switching to mepolizumab (Nucala) or benralizumab (Fasenra),
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NEW ORLEANS – A wearable oscillating vest, designed for treatment of cystic fibrosis, appeared to reduce chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations, according to a retrospective study reported here. After 24 months of wearing the vest, patients achieved a 54.4% reduction in the annualized hospitalization rate for respiratory causes — a reduction in the rate
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NEW ORLEANS — Nearly 60% of nursing facility residents with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) had low peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR, <60 L/min), and for most their treatment was substandard, a researcher reported here. Although long-acting bronchodilators (LABD) are the best medications for patients with low PIFR, they were more likely to get short-acting
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NEW ORLEANS — Asthma patients hospitalized for myocardial infarction (MI) had lower mortality risk than patients without asthma a year after the event, analysis of a nationwide hospital inpatient database indicated. Inpatient mortality was lower in patients with asthma vs controls in the examination of data on approximately 13,000 patients with and without asthma from
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